Friday, June 07, 2013

Labor Of Love

Brett Favre was in the news today after an absence. He has made comments taking at least partial responsibility for the ugly breakup when he 'retired' from the Packers a number of years ago. Brett and that same topic are the focus of this blog penned  on September 4, 2006. a topic which brought great delight to sports writers and web sites everywhere! 

Today is Labor Day and I worked. I didn't clock in or put my dress clothes on but I spent hours in my classroom. There were lesson plans to draw up and post on the Internet and grades to be typed into my computer. But it never feels like work. I love my job so much I feel guilty calling it a job. Not everyone is so blessed but I have a short memory. There is nothing I would rather do than what I do. My profession is one that lets me improve as long as I keep working. This morning, I heard a radio talk show host analyzing quarterback Brett Favre. A fourteen year veteran all-star with the NFL's Green Bay Packers, Favre contemplated retirement in the off season. In an interview, Favre mentioned hearing former New York Giants' quarterback Phil Simms speak about when it was time to quit. Simms said the rule of thumb is that a quarterback should play until he knows his time is up...and then play a few years more. His rationale was that life for him was extremely difficult (boring?) after his career ended so he would recommend holding on as long as possible. In Favre's case, even though past his prime, some team is likely to pay five million dollars per year for his diminished services. Who wouldn't be tempted to take that deal? What would you do with yourself if you retired at thirty-five? I could not stand myself if I wasn't busy doing something productive as long as it is feasible from a physical standpoint. If you were Brett Favre, how would you go from worshipful adulation to being out of the public view? I would guess that the spotlight can cast an addictive shadow.

There is a new TIME-LIFE infomercial: Maltshop Memories. Hosted by teen idol Bobby Rydell, the ad promotes a collection of classic hits from the era between the advent of rock and the coming of the Beatles. Maltshop Memories is crammed with extremely short film clips of 1960's entertainers singing their songs, or mouthing the words, on television shows. One of my favorite shots is of Little Peggy March, lip synching I Will Follow Him. The song hit number one in several countries, including the US. What makes I Will Follow Him more notable is that March was only fifteen at the time, making her the youngest singer on record to have a #1 single. She never came close to that level of success again although she did have several tunes make the bottom part of the charts. Peggy March is still singing today although the little tag, pinned on her due to 4'10" stature, has been discarded. She obviously is gifted and, according to her website, has lived a fulfilling life. Still, I wonder what it would be like to be on top professionally at fifteen and never come close to that rarefied level of success again. If you experience the mountaintop, is everything else at least a little disappointing? Andre Agassi retired yesterday. Did you see it? In an emotional good-bye, Agassi wept before an adoring crowd at the US Open after the tennis legend lost his final match. Only thirty-six and barely old enough to be constitutionally qualified for the Presidency, Agassi faces forty-five to fifty more years of life without the stage he has captivated for two decades. It will be interesting to see his life several years from now. Will he coach or be a commentator? Will he appear in exhibitions? Maybe he will play celebrity doubles matches with Brett Favre. I know this much, even though I am the most casual of tennis fans; Andre Agassi can't just disappear. The game needs his class... and the world needs his work ethic, especially on Labor Day. 


Applicable scripture of the day:
"A man do nothing better than to eat and drink and find satisfaction in his work. This too, I see, is from the hand of God."
Ecclesiastes 2:24
 


Applicable quote of the day:
"With each game I play, each season I play, everyone would agree with me, I'm running out of chances."
Brett Favre



*To listen to Little Peggy March sing her classic I Will Follow Him, please copy and paste the link below:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JVhbusBDi4&feature=related


God bless,
Steve
Luke 18:1

www.hawleybooks.com
E-mail me at steve@hawleybooks.com

1 comment:

Laurie said...

Thanks for working on Labor Day & posting on Edline - noticed last night that you had.
I really have enjoyed your blog & am now keeping up with Max also.
Got & read your book - planning on getting additional copies for gifts.